What  does it feel like when you’re dancing?

“Don’t know. Sort of feels good. It’s sort of stiff and that, but once I get going, then I forget everything and sort of dissapear. Like I feel a change in my whole body. Like there’s fire in my body. I’m just there, flying, like a bird. Like electricity.

reblogged 32 minutes ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 10,396 notes via/source
xbilly elliot xugh i just wrote billiot three times xsomething's wrong with me

Without us, actors would be late, naked, and in the dark.

»

One of my favorite quotes in regards to tech theatre (via jamzm)

This is actually my least favorite quote in regards to tech theater- I have heard many variations of it, seen it on tshirts, etc and it always pisses me off.

The superiority complex that so many technicians/designers have over actors is frankly just stupid. Obviously we high and mighty technicians deign to bestow our marketable skills upon you pitiful, helpless actors in our bountiful free time.

My job has no purpose without actors. I depend on them for my livelihood. My job title is “stage manager-” a stage with nothing on it does not need a manager. We coexist, a symbiotic relationship, like sharks and those little sucker fish that follow the sharks around.

The respect that I have for actors is enormous. It takes skill, hard work, passion, and training, and a level of determination and self-sacrifice that few professions require. I have no illusions about my skill (or lack thereof) as an actor. Without technicians, an actor is “a naked person standing on a dark and empty stage, trying to emote.” I beg to differ. An actor, a decent actor anyway, any actor worth his salt, would not allow a lack of technical assistance to prevent him from telling his story to the audience. He would find some clothes, he would find a light switch, and he would not try to emote. He would act.

It is true that there are sometimes actors who don’t understand what goes into the technical aspect of a production- take, for example the tech process of a musical I recently worked on. We were having sound issues, namely the orchestra was overpowering the cast due to their placement in the house. The cast couldn’t hear themselves in the monitors, no one in the audience could hear them, etc. Instead of working through it, they were angry with our sound designer- Why can’t he just turn down the volume? It’s too loud! They had no concept of how difficult it is to mix a live orchestra, and no trust in the designer to fix the problem as best he could until we could find a more permanent solution (ie, moving the orchestra into another part of the building entirely & just using the monitors).

However, this goes both ways. I recently worked on a production that had a large, moving scenic element that rotated without a fixed point. The actors were moving this unit themselves without a run crew of any kind, and unanimously told me that it was very difficult to move and control- they needed handles. When I relayed this information to the scenic designer, he replied “They don’t need handles. They’re actors. You can’t expect them to figure out how to rotate it correctly on their own.” When we showed him that the way the actors were moving the unit was exactly the way they had been instructed to and it was still unnecessarily difficult, he agreed to the addition of handles.

Basically what this all boils down to is respect. Respect for other artists. Respect for another person’s work. Having enough respect for someone else as a person to view their work as art. Respect for the creative process. Eliminating the sense of “the other” or “the inferior” so that all members of a company are viewed as equals.

Theatre is a collaborative art, y’all. Truly the most collaborative art form in existence, and without respecting your co-collaborators, where are you?

(via colorcodemylife)

Well put. There are MANY students in Tumblr who tend to think that a “high school” mentality of theatre is a constant, when in fact holding such a mindset will relegate you to “hobby actor/techie” (and GOD do I hate the word “techie”) status. Theatre is collaborative, and must be if any of us are going to survive in this business. Placing yourself above another within the same trade is career suicide at best. There is little profit in what we do as it is. If we start cannibalizing our own industry out of pride, then who do we have left. There are MANY who don’t want fine art to thrive as a business, and we as a collective cannot afford to divide ourselves simply to conquer our own egos

Sometimes it takes a working professional’s perspective to put the industry into focus.

(via neotrotsky)

 
reblogged 3 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 628 notes via/source
xtheatre xgood post

cynthia-weil:

"See that you’ve got so much more to be. Before it’s over, before it’s over."

musical theatre female character meme: female character in a male-focused show → rose fenny (dogfight)

reblogged 3 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 110 notes via/source
xdogfight
semiticsemantics:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

semiticsemantics:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.

His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.

He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.

He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.

Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.

It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:

You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent.

People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.

He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

reblogged 4 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 73,038 notes via/source
xhistory
breathtakingdestinations:

Philadelphia - Pennsylvania - USA (by Danny Barron) 

breathtakingdestinations:

Philadelphia - Pennsylvania - USA (by Danny Barron

reblogged 4 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 273 notes via/source
xphiladelphia xhalf fancy half grimy

tattoo-on-my-heart:

this is the best thing I’ve seen

reblogged 4 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 100,091 notes via/source
xdoctor who xperfect cosplay is perfect

It was the natural order of things… all things must die.

reblogged 5 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 600 notes via/source
xthe fall
pdlcomics:

Hands
reblogged 6 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 12,149 notes via/source
xgpoy
Anonymous said:
what the hell was earl doing with a turkey

operafantomet:

Oh, he wasn’t WITH a turkey. He WAS the turkey. But come to think of it, that wasn’t at the Phantom curtain call, it just happened when he was playing the Phantom in the restaged UK tour. 

You can see it here and here. Or here: 
image

answered 6 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 33 notes via/source
xearl carpenter xyou absolute dork xyou are amazing
youatthebarrigaylistentothis:

musical theatre female character meme

12 - A princess
» althea [the light princess]

youatthebarrigaylistentothis:

musical theatre female character meme

12 - A princess

» althea [the light princess]
reblogged 6 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 4 notes via/source
xthe light princess
Kids (MGMT cover)
Of Monsters and Men
210,511 plays

Nanna Bryndís Hilmarsdóttir (vocals) and Brynjar Liefsson (guitar) cover MGMT’s Kids

reblogged 7 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 29,724 notes via/source
xmusic

disneylicious-art:

Tangled Concept Art by Paul Felix

reblogged 8 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 2,546 notes via/source
xtangled xconcept art

Favorites of Theatre - Annaleigh Ashford

reblogged 8 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 118 notes via/source
xannaleigh ashford

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Villa Vals

Architects CMA and SeARCH were focusing on the question if it would be possible to conceal a house in an Alpine slope while still exploiting the wonderful views and allowing light to enter the building when planing the Villa Vals. They decided to build a central patio into the steep incline to create a large facade with considerable potential for window openings. The viewing angle from the building is slightly inclined, giving a dramatic view of the beautiful mountains on the opposite side of the narrow valley.

All images © Iwan Baan

reblogged 9 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 50,890 notes via/source
xplaces xarchitecture x(do i have an architecture tag?) x(well i do now)

archiemcphee:

Awesome Anamorphic Artwork isn’t restricted to walls, floors and sketchbooks. There’s a whole amazing subset that, instead of having the viewer stand in just the right spot, requires looking at flat image or sculpture reflected in a cylindrical mirror in order to see it properly.

Last month the folks at Bored Panda assembled a fascinating collection of 23 examples of this mind-bending art form. Here you see pieces by István Orosz, Jonty Hurwitz, Vera Bugatti and Awtar Singh Virdi respectively.

Click here to view the entire post.

[via Bored Panda]

reblogged 9 hours ago @ 19 Sep 2014 with 1,378 notes via/source
xart xi am so impressed